The Jekyll and Hyde Myth Of Nathan Bedford Forrest

Nathan Bedford Forrest

A few miles near Tuscumbia, Alabama, the Confederate Army marched along the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. Private Phillip D. Stephenson, loader of piece No. 4, 5th Washington Artillery, Army of Tennessee, had fallen behind. It was as if the hunger in his belly had moved down to his legs and feet, hollowing out the muscles …

Read moreThe Jekyll and Hyde Myth Of Nathan Bedford Forrest

The Bixby Letter: A New Analysis Casts Doubt

The Bixby Letter: A New Analysis Casts Doubt 1

One of the most extravagantly admired of all Lincoln documents is the letter to the Widow Bixby, written on November 21, 1864. James G. Randall and Richard N. Current declared that it “stands with the Gettysburg address as a masterpiece in the English language.”[1] Another Lincoln biographer, David A. Anderson, claimed that “Lincoln’s three greatest …

Read moreThe Bixby Letter: A New Analysis Casts Doubt

Alfred C. Kinsey and his Religious Encounters

Alfred C. Kinsey and his Religious Encounters 2

Alfred C. Kinsey (1894–1956), the entomologist-turned-sexologist whose taxonomic reports on American sexual behavior electrified the nation, was a notorious provocateur. The two major volumes he supervised, Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (1948) and Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953), were the publishing sensations of their day and roused zealous if discordant responses across …

Read moreAlfred C. Kinsey and his Religious Encounters

Who discovered DNA?

Who discovered DNA? 3

ON APRIL 25, 1953, three papers were published in Nature, the prestigious scientific journal,[1] which exposed the “fundamentally beautiful”[2] structure of DNA to the public, and sounded the starting gun of the DNA Revolution.[3] The authors of these papers revealed the now-famous double-helix structure of DNA, thereby unlocking the secret code of the human gene. …

Read moreWho discovered DNA?

William McKinley: Modern-Day Relevance of a Conflicted Past

William McKinley: Modern-Day Relevance of a Conflicted Past 4

In the presidential campaign of 2004, George W. Bush’s advisor Karl Rove repeated to journalists his long-standing explanation of why he admires William McKinley and expects Bush to reproduce what Rove regards as McKinley’s successes.[1] In 2003, Kevin Phillips, a Bush critic, wrote a book explaining how much he also admires McKinley.[2] Eric Schlosser, a …

Read moreWilliam McKinley: Modern-Day Relevance of a Conflicted Past